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/contrib/ntp/ntpd/refclock_local.c

https://bitbucket.org/freebsd/freebsd-head/
C | 258 lines | 110 code | 25 blank | 123 comment | 6 complexity | 2765899891e6b683c73f1940f25d2fa0 MD5 | raw file
  1
  2/*
  3 * refclock_local - local pseudo-clock driver
  4 *
  5 * wjm 17-aug-1995: add a hook for special treatment of VMS_LOCALUNIT
  6 */
  7#ifdef HAVE_CONFIG_H
  8#include <config.h>
  9#endif
 10
 11#ifdef REFCLOCK
 12
 13#include "ntpd.h"
 14#include "ntp_refclock.h"
 15#include "ntp_stdlib.h"
 16
 17#include <stdio.h>
 18#include <ctype.h>
 19
 20#ifdef KERNEL_PLL
 21#include "ntp_syscall.h"
 22#endif
 23
 24/*
 25 * This is a hack to allow a machine to use its own system clock as a
 26 * reference clock, i.e., to free-run using no outside clock discipline
 27 * source. This is useful if you want to use NTP in an isolated
 28 * environment with no radio clock or NIST modem available. Pick a
 29 * machine that you figure has a good clock oscillator and configure it
 30 * with this driver. Set the clock using the best means available, like
 31 * eyeball-and-wristwatch. Then, point all the other machines at this
 32 * one or use broadcast (not multicast) mode to distribute time.
 33 *
 34 * Another application for this driver is if you want to use a
 35 * particular server's clock as the clock of last resort when all other
 36 * normal synchronization sources have gone away. This is especially
 37 * useful if that server has an ovenized oscillator. For this you would
 38 * configure this driver at a higher stratum (say 5) to prevent the
 39 * server's stratum from falling below that.
 40 *
 41 * A third application for this driver is when an external discipline
 42 * source is available, such as the NIST "lockclock" program, which
 43 * synchronizes the local clock via a telephone modem and the NIST
 44 * Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS), or the Digital Time
 45 * Synchronization Service (DTSS), which runs on DCE machines. In this
 46 * case the stratum should be set at zero, indicating a bona fide
 47 * stratum-1 source. Exercise some caution with this, since there is no
 48 * easy way to telegraph via NTP that something might be wrong in the
 49 * discipline source itself. In the case of DTSS, the local clock can
 50 * have a rather large jitter, depending on the interval between
 51 * corrections and the intrinsic frequency error of the clock
 52 * oscillator. In extreme cases, this can cause clients to exceed the
 53 * 128-ms slew window and drop off the NTP subnet.
 54 *
 55 * THis driver includes provisions to telegraph synchronization state
 56 * and related variables by means of kernel variables with specially
 57 * modified kernels. This is done using the ntp_adjtime() syscall.
 58 * In the cases where another protocol or device synchronizes the local
 59 * host, the data given to the kernel can be slurped up by this driver
 60 * and distributed to clients by ordinary NTP messaging.
 61 *
 62 * In the default mode the behavior of the clock selection algorithm is
 63 * modified when this driver is in use. The algorithm is designed so
 64 * that this driver will never be selected unless no other discipline
 65 * source is available. This can be overriden with the prefer keyword of
 66 * the server configuration command, in which case only this driver will
 67 * be selected for synchronization and all other discipline sources will
 68 * be ignored. This behavior is intended for use when an external
 69 * discipline source controls the system clock.
 70 *
 71 * Fudge Factors
 72 *
 73 * The stratum for this driver set at 5 by default, but it can be
 74 * changed by the fudge command and/or the ntpdc utility. The reference
 75 * ID is 127.0.0.1 by default, but can be changed using the same mechanism.
 76 * *NEVER* configure this driver to operate at a stratum which might
 77 * possibly disrupt a client with access to a bona fide primary server,
 78 * unless the local clock oscillator is reliably disciplined by another
 79 * source. *NEVER NEVER* configure a server which might devolve to an
 80 * undisciplined local clock to use multicast mode. Always remember that
 81 * an improperly configured local clock driver let loose in the Internet
 82 * can cause very serious disruption. This is why most of us who care
 83 * about good time use cryptographic authentication.
 84 *
 85 * This driver provides a mechanism to trim the local clock in both time
 86 * and frequency, as well as a way to manipulate the leap bits. The
 87 * fudge time1 parameter adjusts the time, in seconds, and the fudge
 88 * time2 parameter adjusts the frequency, in ppm. The fudge time1
 89 * parameter is additive; that is, it adds an increment to the current
 90 * time. The fudge time2 parameter directly sets the frequency.
 91 */
 92/*
 93 * Local interface definitions
 94 */
 95#define PRECISION	(-7)	/* about 10 ms precision */
 96#define DESCRIPTION "Undisciplined local clock" /* WRU */
 97#define STRATUM 	5	/* default stratum */
 98#define DISPERSION	.01	/* default dispersion (10 ms) */
 99
100/*
101 * Imported from the timer module
102 */
103extern u_long current_time;
104
105/*
106 * Imported from ntp_proto
107 */
108extern s_char sys_precision;
109
110#ifdef KERNEL_PLL
111/*
112 * Imported from ntp_loopfilter
113 */
114extern int pll_control; 	/* kernel pll control */
115extern int kern_enable;		/* kernel pll enabled */
116extern int ext_enable;		/* external clock enable */
117#endif /* KERNEL_PLL */
118
119/*
120 * Function prototypes
121 */
122static	int local_start P((int, struct peer *));
123static	void	local_poll	P((int, struct peer *));
124
125/*
126 * Local variables
127 */
128static	u_long poll_time;	/* last time polled */
129	
130/*
131 * Transfer vector
132 */
133struct	refclock refclock_local = {
134	local_start,		/* start up driver */
135	noentry,		/* shut down driver (not used) */
136	local_poll,	 	/* transmit poll message */
137	noentry,		/* not used (old lcl_control) */
138	noentry,		/* initialize driver (not used) */
139	noentry,		/* not used (old lcl_buginfo) */
140	NOFLAGS 		/* not used */
141};
142
143
144/*
145 * local_start - start up the clock
146 */
147static int
148local_start(
149	int unit,
150	struct peer *peer
151	)
152{
153	struct refclockproc *pp;
154
155	pp = peer->procptr;
156
157	/*
158	 * Initialize miscellaneous variables
159	 */
160	peer->precision = sys_precision;
161	pp->leap = LEAP_NOTINSYNC;
162	peer->stratum = STRATUM;
163	pp->stratum = STRATUM;
164	pp->clockdesc = DESCRIPTION;
165	memcpy(&pp->refid, "LOCL", 4);
166	poll_time = current_time;
167	return (1);
168}
169
170
171/*
172 * local_poll - called by the transmit procedure
173 *
174 * LOCKCLOCK: If the kernel supports the nanokernel or microkernel
175 * system calls, the leap bits are extracted from the kernel. If there
176 * is a kernel error or the kernel leap bits are set to 11, the NTP leap
177 * bits are set to 11 and the stratum is set to infinity. Otherwise, the
178 * NTP leap bits are set to the kernel leap bits and the stratum is set
179 * as fudged. This behavior does not faithfully follow the
180 * specification, but is probably more appropriate in a multiple-server
181 * national laboratory network.
182 */
183static void
184local_poll(
185	int unit,
186	struct peer *peer
187	)
188{
189#if defined(KERNEL_PLL) && defined(LOCKCLOCK)
190	struct timex ntv;
191#endif /* KERNEL_PLL LOCKCLOCK */
192	struct refclockproc *pp;
193
194#if defined(VMS) && defined(VMS_LOCALUNIT)
195	if (unit == VMS_LOCALUNIT) {
196		extern void vms_local_poll(struct peer *);
197
198		vms_local_poll(peer);
199		return;
200	}
201#endif /* VMS && VMS_LOCALUNIT */
202	pp = peer->procptr;
203	pp->polls++;
204
205	/*
206	 * Ramble through the usual filtering and grooming code, which
207	 * is essentially a no-op and included mostly for pretty
208	 * billboards. We allow a one-time time adjustment using fudge
209	 * time1 (s) and a continuous frequency adjustment using fudge
210	 * time 2 (ppm).
211	 */
212	get_systime(&pp->lastrec);
213	pp->fudgetime1 += pp->fudgetime2 * 1e-6 * (current_time -
214	    poll_time);
215	poll_time = current_time;
216	refclock_process_offset(pp, pp->lastrec, pp->lastrec,
217	    pp->fudgetime1);
218
219	/*
220	 * If another process is disciplining the system clock, we set
221	 * the leap bits and quality indicators from the kernel.
222	 */
223#if defined(KERNEL_PLL) && defined(LOCKCLOCK)
224	memset(&ntv,  0, sizeof ntv);
225	switch (ntp_adjtime(&ntv)) {
226	case TIME_OK:
227		pp->leap = LEAP_NOWARNING;
228		peer->stratum = pp->stratum;
229		break;
230
231	case TIME_INS:
232		pp->leap = LEAP_ADDSECOND;
233		peer->stratum = pp->stratum;
234		break;
235
236	case TIME_DEL:
237		pp->leap = LEAP_DELSECOND;
238		peer->stratum = pp->stratum;
239		break;
240
241	default:
242		pp->leap = LEAP_NOTINSYNC;
243		peer->stratum = STRATUM_UNSPEC;
244	}
245	pp->disp = 0;
246	pp->jitter = 0;
247#else /* KERNEL_PLL LOCKCLOCK */
248	pp->leap = LEAP_NOWARNING;
249	pp->disp = DISPERSION;
250	pp->jitter = 0;
251#endif /* KERNEL_PLL LOCKCLOCK */
252	pp->lastref = pp->lastrec;
253	refclock_receive(peer);
254	pp->fudgetime1 = 0;
255}
256#else
257int refclock_local_bs;
258#endif /* REFCLOCK */